Review of “Pooh’s Heffalump Movie” (2005)

A digital and simplistic painting of a meadow with a bush and a dark-haired creature with a trunk behind the bush – image source from Pexels – NOT from the movie

A strange, trumpeting sound awakens the creatures of Hundred Acre Wood… and scares them. They all run to Rabbit’s home and scream about what they’d heard. Roo, however, is excited to know about the trumpeting noise, and wants to participate in the quest to stop the source of the trumpeting – which is believed to be a heffalump.

However, the other animals tell Roo that the mission isn’t safe for him, leaving him upset. Kanga calls him home, and Roo tells her that he is eager to grow up. That way, he can capture the heffalump. She sweetly agrees with the others that the journey is unsafe for him and puts him to bed.

The next morning, Roo goes out of Hundred Acre Wood alone and captures the heffalump, which turns out to be a friendly, young elephant-like creature, who loves to play. His name is Lumpy, who Roo befriends. Unfortunately, the others from Hundred Acre Wood attack Lumpy, and Roo begs them to stop. Will the Hundred Acre Wood habitants listen to Roo and accept Lumpy as a harmless, playful creature?

I must admit how cute and beautiful this movie turned out to be. From Roo’s friendship with Lumpy to the silliness of Tigger, Piglet, and Pooh, as well as the seriousness of Rabbit and Eeyore’s normal low moods, the characters kept my interest. I actually found them more likable than in the 2011 film, “Winnie-the-Pooh.”

Which brings me to my next point: when the characters sing a song about the mysterious heffalump, their envisions and fears of it make more sense and are more logical than the song about the “Backson” monster they sing in the 2011 movie. You can read my review of that film here.

One of the best musical numbers is the song about names that Lumpy introduces to Roo, when the two first meet. Additional strengths include the other songs, the twists and turns, both happy and sad, and the characterization of each creature, especially Kanga. She is her normal sweet, gentle self.

Regardless of the perks, the characters’ actions did make me do more than a few facepalms. Yet, no character should be perfect or flawless.

Overall, I enjoyed “Pooh’s Heffalump Movie.” I would rate it 4.5 out of 5 stars, and would recommend it.

Published by Sunayna Prasad

I enjoy writing stories, creating artwork, watching movies and TV shows, cooking, and traveling. These are the topics of my posts. I also publish books, where you can learn about them on my website, www.sunaynaprasadbooks.com. Be sure to copy and paste the link and subscribe to my newsletter on the email list button on the homepage.

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